Understanding the Signs of Sleep Apnea Part 3: Hypertension

Hypertension and obstructive sleep apnea often go hand in hand, so it’s important for those with elevated blood pressure to know the signs of OSA since these two conditions often come as a pair.

OSA occurs when breathing is repeatedly and briefly disrupted during sleep and has been linked to high blood pressure. Elevated blood pressure levels have also been shown to cause sleep apnea or to worsen breathing in patients who already have OSA.

Sleep apnea occurs when a snorer stops breathing for a brief amount of time. These episodes can wake the individual as they take in a gasp of air. All of this leads to restless nights, a loss of sleep, and can also be associated with arrhythmia, stroke and even heart failure.

According to a recent study, OSA is most commonly found in middle-aged adults between the ages of 30 and 70. The disorder affects more men than women, and many of those who suffer from both maladies are also overweight.

Although anywhere from 30 to 70 percent of patients with hypertension may also have OSA, it more frequently occurs in those who have resistant hypertension and have unsuccessfully tried a number of treatment options to bring their blood pressure numbers to a more normal level.

The good news is that Vivos Therapeutics provides treatment for both OSA and hypertension. These services seek to ensure that your breathing passages are open with oxygen flowing, so that blood pressure levels can come down quickly.

Blood pressure levels normally dip at night and this dip does not occur in patients with OSA.

Getting a good night’s sleep is one of the keys to overall good health and normal blood pressure levels. There are a few steps to you can take to ensure you get a restful night of sleep:

  1. Get some exercise, but get that workout in a few hours before you go to bed so your adrenaline levels come down before you turn the lights out.
  1. Limit alcohol consumption and avoid caffeine before bed.
  1. Develop a pre-bedtime routine such as a hot bath; dimming the lights; and turning off unnecessary electronic devices.